• Reuters

    Supreme Court ruling on Oklahoma tribal land raises questions for oil industry

    A U.S. Supreme Court decision recognizing about half of Oklahoma as Native American reservation land has implications for oil and gas development in the state, raising complex regulatory and tax questions that could take years to settle, according to Oklahoma attorneys. The court on Thursday overturned an Oklahoma tribe member’s rape conviction because the location where the crime was committed should have been considered reservation land and therefore outside the reach of state criminal law. The decision does not affect property ownership, but attorneys said it has regulatory and tax implications within reservation lands of the state's "Five Tribes" - Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole.

  • Amazon begins rolling out bigger UPS and FedEx-style delivery trucks
    Reuters

    Amazon begins rolling out bigger UPS and FedEx-style delivery trucks

    Amazon.com is launching a new fleet of bigger, boxier trucks like those favored by rival package carriers United Parcel Service Inc and FedEx Corp, as it fights to fix widespread pandemic-fueled delivery delays that sent customers into the arms of competitors like Walmart Inc. The world's largest online retailer ordered more than 2,200 heavy-duty Utilimaster "walk-in" delivery trucks from Shyft Group, a Michigan-based specialty vehicle company, an Amazon spokeswoman told Reuters. The company declined to say how many of the vehicles have been sent to Amazon delivery contractors, or where they would be deployed.

  • Joint Chiefs chairman says Confederate names on military installations are divisive and offensive, setting up prospect of Trump clash
    MarketWatch

    Joint Chiefs chairman says Confederate names on military installations are divisive and offensive, setting up prospect of Trump clash

    Army Gen. Mark Milley says South’s rebellion against the federal government was ‘an act of treason at the time, against the Union, against the Stars and Stripes, against the U.S. Constitution.’

  • Reuters

    G4S ends tagging inquiry with $56 million UK fraud office deal

    The SFO began investigating G4S and Serco in 2013 over bills charged to the British government for tagging people who were either dead, in prison or had not been tagged. "We have apologised to the UK Government and implemented significant changes to people, policies, practices and controls," G4S Chief Executive Ashley Almanza said.

  • 4 must-dos when refinancing into a record-low mortgage rate
    MoneyWise

    4 must-dos when refinancing into a record-low mortgage rate

    Thinking about a refi? Don't forget about these essentials.

  • Republicans seek to equate protesters with rioters and violent criminals — and link them all to Democrats
    MarketWatch

    Republicans seek to equate protesters with rioters and violent criminals — and link them all to Democrats

    The 30-second ad by President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign ends with the phrase “You won’t be safe in Joe Biden’s America” emblazoned across a flickering hellscape. It blames a push by progressive activists to defund the police as “violent crime has exploded.” With recent shootings that have killed children and dozens of others in cities with large Black populations including New York, Atlanta and Chicago, the GOP is trying to play offense, ominously.

  • ‘White Noise’: Film Review
    Variety

    ‘White Noise’: Film Review

    In "White Noise," Daniel Lombroso’s lively and disturbing documentary portrait of three alt-right influencers, there’s a riveting scene in which Richard Spencer, a rock star of white nationalism who talks like a noodgy corporate assistant and has meticulous gelled hair that’s supposed to be his designer version of a Hitler fade (though Hitler didn’t have […]

  • In debate over school reopenings, it’s Trump vs. the health experts — again
    MarketWatch

    In debate over school reopenings, it’s Trump vs. the health experts — again

    In his latest beef with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the president is accusing the health agency of ‘asking schools to do very impractical things’ in order to reopen.

  • Billionaire Musk's net worth zooms past Warren Buffett's - Bloomberg News
    Reuters

    Billionaire Musk's net worth zooms past Warren Buffett's - Bloomberg News

    Musk's fortune rose by $6.07 billion on Friday, Bloomberg News said, following a 10.8% jump in the electric carmaker's stock. Buffett's net worth dropped earlier this week when he donated $2.9 billion in Berkshire Hathaway <BRKa.N> stock to charity, the report added.

  • Trump has assigned Homeland Security a new task: defending statues and monuments
    MarketWatch

    Trump has assigned Homeland Security a new task: defending statues and monuments

    DHS, created after the 2001 terror attacks and primarily on guard against threats from abroad, has during the Trump presidency largely focused on carrying out the president’s immigration agenda.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    World Watch

    The Trump administration said it would put tariffs on $1.3 billion of French imports if Paris doesn’t back down from plans to impose a new digital-services tax that would fall heavily on U.S. technology companies.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    U.S. Watch

    A newly discovered comet is streaking past Earth, providing a stunning show after buzzing the sun and expanding its tail.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    What’s It Like to Visit a Winery Tasting Room Now?

    The rules for tasting at a winery were once pretty simple. Don’t wear perfume. Don’t forget to spit. And don’t ask tasting room staff to pour you “the good stuff.” In this time of Covid-19, the edicts are similarly straightforward, but there are more to consider. Wear a mask. Wash your hands. Use hand sanitizer. Keep 6 feet away from strangers. And sign the “contact tracing” sheet just in case someone in the tasting room contracts the virus.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    Parks and Trepidation?

    Ipulled up to delicate arch, the star attraction at Utah’s Arches National Park, at sunrise in mid-June. As I approached, before I had a clear view of the actual rock formation, I noticed about 30 people, huddled in small groups, hushed, seemingly all focused on the tall, impossibly slender arch as the sun’s brightening rays illuminated the park. I climbed a little higher, ready to view the arch in all its morning magnificence, then finally saw what everyone else was actually staring at.

  • The Lockdown’s Lessons for Climate Activism
    The Wall Street Journal

    The Lockdown’s Lessons for Climate Activism

    The pandemic has deeply cut carbon emissions, but the human and economic costs should give pause to those who imagine remaking the world’s habits of consumption

  • The Wall Street Journal

    What’s News: Business & Finance

    What’s News: Business & Finance

  • The Data-Driven Tech Engine at the Heart of Hollywood’s Content Factories
    The Wall Street Journal

    The Data-Driven Tech Engine at the Heart of Hollywood’s Content Factories

    Coronavirus and the era of stay-at-home binge-watching is accelerating the entertainment industry’s reliance on analytics and data to target its productions to the increasingly fractured tastes of a nation.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    In Michigan, Protests Reshape Campaign

    EASTPOINTE, Mich.—The leaders of this majority-white suburb in the early 1990s ditched the name “East Detroit,” an attempt to get rid of the association with a majority Black city where crime rates had risen. The new name was supposed to evoke the Grosse Pointe communities, some of the most wealthy, and white, enclaves in southeast Michigan.

  • Coronavirus Barges Back to the Campaign Forefront
    The Wall Street Journal

    Coronavirus Barges Back to the Campaign Forefront

    The pandemic has returned as the biggest factor in the political equation, campaign aides on both sides say, as it surges across Republican-friendly states of the South and West.

  • The Wall Street Journal

    Lockdowns Highlight The Climate ChallengeClimate Strategy Faces the ‘Rebound Effect’

    For decades, climate activists have exhorted people in the wealthy West to change their personal behavior to cut carbon emissions. We have been told to drive less, to stop flying and, in general, to reduce consumption—all in the name of saving the planet from ever higher temperatures.

  • Financial Times

    String of murders chills Chechen exiles in Europe

    Mamikhan Umarov turned to the camera in front of Vienna’s airport last week and dared Chechnya’s strongman ruler to kill him. “Come and stop me!” he said in a video he posted on YouTube. Two days later, Umarov — better known as his YouTube alter ego Anzor from Vienna — was shot dead, the fourth assassination or attempted killing of a Chechen dissident in Europe over the past year.

  • Financial Times

    What Tel Aviv’s blacked-out billboards tell us about life under lockdown

    The Israeli photographer Daniel Tchetchik noticed something else too. Then, this week, the health minister Yuli Edelstein announced that restrictions would be reimposed in parts of Israel following a surge in coronavirus cases.

  • Financial Times

    The ‘miracle’ of this year’s Bordeaux en primeur campaign

    Every spring the Bordeaux wine trade invites thousands of wine merchants and media to taste cask samples of the previous year’s vintage, hoping that their reactions and scores respectively will help them sell the wines en primeur, when their prices are individually released over a few weeks in early summer. Thanks to relentlessly rising release prices and the plethora of increasingly exciting alternatives, there were signs that the world’s wine drinkers were becoming increasingly disillusioned with Bordeaux in general and buying en primeur in particular, as it no longer seemed to make economic sense. It was often possible to buy a more mature vintage at the same price as the embryonic, yet-to-be-bottled one.

  • Financial Times

    US Mint: a penny saved

    In San Francisco and New York cashless stores are banned. Offering no option to pay with coins and notes is seen as discriminating against Americans without a bank account. The US pushback against a cashless society has this year coincided with a shortage of coins.

  • Financial Times

    Bunker Food: why I reached for my Nonna’s polenta recipe

    No food was ever as tasty as Nonna’s. She was damn sure of it — and made sure we were too. At Italian restaurants, she’d quiz my brother and me. Nonna arrived in Canada with my father and grandfather from the northern Italian city of Trieste in the wake of the border changes following the second world war.

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