Deutsche Märkte öffnen in 3 Stunden 7 Minuten

Illumina, Inc. (ILMN)

NasdaqGS - NasdaqGS Echtzeitpreis. Währung in USD
Zur Watchlist hinzufügen
425,58-7,24 (-1,67%)
Börsenschluss: 4:00PM EDT
425,00 -0,58 (-0,14%)
Nachbörse: 06:57PM EDT
Melden Sie sich an, um eine Nachricht zu posten.
  • O
    Oliver
    $sens and $ilmn are game changing medical technologies !
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    $ILMN $508, $BNGO $6. BNGO clearly has a great product and 226% YoY revenue increase and plenty of cash on hand. Nothing but growth in both the company and the industry on the horizon. ILMN PPS clearly shows the industry direction and potential. There is absolutely no reason to sell this stock.
  • G
    Galactus
    $OCGN conversation
    Analysts: You're Going To Lose Up To 30% On These 10 Stocks
    "#MRNA", #WAT, #ALB, #IRM, #ORCL, #NUE, #RHI, #MTD, #ILMN, #KR
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    $ILMN trading with a PE of 115 and a market cap of 72.09B. The projected growth in this arena is massive. $BNGO positioned perfectly to tap into that potential.
  • R
    RV
    $PACB conversation
    O/T: ILMN news:

    TerraPharma
    @TerraPharma1
    ·
    1h
    European Commission Opens In-Depth Investigation of $8B Illumina-Grail Merger

    cont. "In the US, Illumina has offered its existing customers — potential competitors — guaranteed supply agreements for up to 12 years and a commitment to lower sequencing price per gigabase by 40 percent by 2025." $ILMN
  • F
    Flowjob
    $BNGO conversation
    Many requested if I could Pin this Post, I will just post this here again - A bit long but definitely worth it,
    As shared by someone who works as a Head of Lab and has first hand experience with Bionano for over 5 years.
    "In genomics (or next generation sequencing), there are so far three main players in the field. The first one is big player Illumina. They offer methods for ‘short read’ sequencing of a maximum length of 600 base pairs (building blocks of DNA). This is sufficient for many questions, but it has its limitations for the sequencing and especially the assembly of a genome. Imagine that your genome consists of many repetitive stretches of your building blocks. If they are longer than 600 bp, you have absolutely no chance to figure out how they are arranged and how many of them it is. This is where third generation sequencing comes into play (‘long read sequencing’). Two main players are on the market. First one is Pacific Biosciences. They released a new technology and a new machine in 2019 (SequelII and HiFi reads). With this you are able to do assemblies of approx. 30 megabases = 30 million base pairs. Human chromosomes (the subunits of the genome) are however 250 million base pairs, so even with PacBio you are not able to sequence a full chromosome. The other big player in long read business is Oxford Nanopore. Don’t want to go into details, but they have a different technique (which is also extremely promising) but they are currently not as accurate as PacBio…maybe in 2-3 years. Also, they have different advantages, which are not relevant for the field in which Bionano is important. So now, where is Bionano? First of all: Bionano does not sequence genomes. I read this very often, but they simply don’t. Bionano does labelling of specific (known!) sequences in the genome and afterwards takes an image of this. By the relative position of these labels, they can create an overall structure of the chromosomes. So, if you have an insertion or deletion somewhere (e.g. in cancer or any other disease which is manifested in the DNA architecture), one of the labels gets shifted and this gets detected. Same is true for relocation of certain sequences. Many of these genomic abnormalities can also be detected with ‘long read sequencing’, but Bionano can detect more, is cheaper and faster. In conclusion, the most important thing is to say, that Bionano doesn’t compete with Illumina or PacBio. They rely on the exact nucleotide sequence of the genome, which is created using, usually a mixture of PacBio/nanopore and Illumina. The assembly of the genome can then be assisted with Bionano. But the greatest potential of Bionano is to be established in diagnostics, where it can replace the traditional clinical cytogenetics, which is costly, time consuming and not very precise. We are on the way to personalized medicine in the future and in my opinion, Bionano will play a key role in it, when it comes to diseases linked to chromosomal abnormalities. This will be a huge market in future and therefore I invest in BNGO…
    One thing to add: FDA approval is secondary for Bionano. It still can be used. You can still call it 'research use only' and use it for diagnostics. As far as I know PacBio doesn't have any FDA approval, neither does Illumnias biggest machine (NovaSeq). Only 2 smaller sequencers of $ILMN (Illumina) are approved".

    I don't understand the technical aspects I still have a long way to go, but I have been reading and watching a lot about genome mapping vs sequencing and can understand where the difference lies and how this tech can be used along with others but still have a unique aspect which is unparalleled in the Industry and for many more years to come.
    Also I read Simon Barnett from Ark invest's Twitter lately and understand that FDA approval is not mandatory for BNGO to sell more units of Saphyr 'for research use' thanks for confirming that!
    Ignore the panic sellers and people who have a short sighted vision who are locking profits only to realize much later that they own much lesser shares.
    Most people don't understand how Tesla and NIO make their cars or their battery technology but they remain invested, It's only a matter of time before the world will know that Bionano is the future of Genomics and Diagnostics. BNGO It is not a trade it's a retirement worthy Investment. Give this gem at least 6-12 months to see the real potential, 30-50 EOY.
    All my shares are locked in a vault.
  • F
    Flowjob
    $BNGO conversation
    A Bit long but definitely worth a read! shared by someone on Etoro who works as a head of lab and has had first hand experience with Bionano for over 5 years.
    In genomics (or next generation sequencing), there are so far three main players in the field. The first one is big player Illumina. They offer methods for ‘short read’ sequencing of a maximum length of 600 base pairs (building blocks of DNA). This is sufficient for many questions, but it has its limitations for the sequencing and especially the assembly of a genome. Imagine that your genome consists of many repetitive stretches of your building blocks. If they are longer than 600 bp, you have absolutely no chance to figure out how they are arranged and how many of them it is. This is where third generation sequencing comes into play (‘long read sequencing’). Two main players are on the market. First one is Pacific Biosciences. They released a new technology and a new machine in 2019 (SequelII and HiFi reads). With this you are able to do assemblies of approx. 30 megabases = 30 million base pairs. Human chromosomes (the subunits of the genome) are however 250 million base pairs, so even with PacBio you are not able to sequence a full chromosome. The other big player in long read business is Oxford Nanopore. Don’t want to go into details, but they have a different technique (which is also extremely promising) but they are currently not as accurate as PacBio…maybe in 2-3 years. Also, they have different advantages, which are not relevant for the field in which Bionano is important. So now, where is Bionano? First of all: Bionano does not sequence genomes. I read this very often, but they simply don’t. Bionano does labelling of specific (known!) sequences in the genome and afterwards takes an image of this. By the relative position of these labels, they can create an overall structure of the chromosomes. So, if you have an insertion or deletion somewhere (e.g. in cancer or any other disease which is manifested in the DNA architecture), one of the labels gets shifted and this gets detected. Same is true for relocation of certain sequences. Many of these genomic abnormalities can also be detected with ‘long read sequencing’, but Bionano can detect more, is cheaper and faster. In conclusion, the most important thing is to say, that Bionano doesn’t compete with Illumina or PacBio. They rely on the exact nucleotide sequence of the genome, which is created using, usually a mixture of PacBio/nanopore and Illumina. The assembly of the genome can then be assisted with Bionano. But the greatest potential of Bionano is to be established in diagnostics, where it can replace the traditional clinical cytogenetics, which is costly, time consuming and not very precise. We are on the way to personalized medicine in the future and in my opinion, Bionano will play a key role in it, when it comes to diseases linked to chromosomal abnormalities. This will be a huge market in future and therefore I invest in BNGO…
    One thing to add: FDA approval is secondary for Bionano. It still can be used. You can still call it 'research use only' and use it for diagnostics. As far as I know PacBio doesn't have any FDA approval, neither does Illumnias biggest machine (NovaSeq). Only 2 smaller sequencers of $ilmn are approved.

    I don't understand the technical aspects I still have a long way to go, but I have been reading and watching a lot about genome mapping vs sequencing and can understand where the difference lies and how this tech can be used along with others but still have a unique aspect which is unparalleled in the Industry.
    Also I read Simon Barnett from Ark invest's Twitter lately and understand that FDA approval is not mandatory for BNGO to sell more units of Saphyr thanks for confirming that!

    I believe in BNGO and the future of Genomics!!
  • n
    nallagula s
    $BNGO conversation
    A Bit long but definitely worth a read! shared by someone on Etoro who works as a head of lab and has had first hand experience with Bionano for over 5 years.
    In genomics (or next generation sequencing), there are so far three main players in the field. The first one is big player Illumina. They offer methods for ‘short read’ sequencing of a maximum length of 600 base pairs (building blocks of DNA). This is sufficient for many questions, but it has its limitations for the sequencing and especially the assembly of a genome. Imagine that your genome consists of many repetitive stretches of your building blocks. If they are longer than 600 bp, you have absolutely no chance to figure out how they are arranged and how many of them it is. This is where third generation sequencing comes into play (‘long read sequencing’). Two main players are on the market. First one is Pacific Biosciences. They released a new technology and a new machine in 2019 (SequelII and HiFi reads). With this you are able to do assemblies of approx. 30 megabases = 30 million base pairs. Human chromosomes (the subunits of the genome) are however 250 million base pairs, so even with PacBio you are not able to sequence a full chromosome. The other big player in long read business is Oxford Nanopore. Don’t want to go into details, but they have a different technique (which is also extremely promising) but they are currently not as accurate as PacBio…maybe in 2-3 years. Also, they have different advantages, which are not relevant for the field in which Bionano is important. So now, where is Bionano? First of all: Bionano does not sequence genomes. I read this very often, but they simply don’t. Bionano does labelling of specific (known!) sequences in the genome and afterwards takes an image of this. By the relative position of these labels, they can create an overall structure of the chromosomes. So, if you have an insertion or deletion somewhere (e.g. in cancer or any other disease which is manifested in the DNA architecture), one of the labels gets shifted and this gets detected. Same is true for relocation of certain sequences. Many of these genomic abnormalities can also be detected with ‘long read sequencing’, but Bionano can detect more, is cheaper and faster. In conclusion, the most important thing is to say, that Bionano doesn’t compete with Illumina or PacBio. They rely on the exact nucleotide sequence of the genome, which is created using, usually a mixture of PacBio/nanopore and Illumina. The assembly of the genome can then be assisted with Bionano. But the greatest potential of Bionano is to be established in diagnostics, where it can replace the traditional clinical cytogenetics, which is costly, time consuming and not very precise. We are on the way to personalized medicine in the future and in my opinion, Bionano will play a key role in it, when it comes to diseases linked to chromosomal abnormalities. This will be a huge market in future and therefore I invest in BNGO…
    One thing to add: FDA approval is secondary for Bionano. It still can be used. You can still call it 'research use only' and use it for diagnostics. As far as I know PacBio doesn't have any FDA approval, neither does Illumnias biggest machine (NovaSeq). Only 2 smaller sequencers of $ilmn are approved.

    I don't understand the technical aspects I still have a long way to go, but I have been reading and watching a lot about genome mapping vs sequencing and can understand where the difference lies and how this tech can be used along with others but still have a unique aspect which is unparalleled in the Industry.
    Also I read Simon Barnett from Ark invest's Twitter lately and understand that FDA approval is not mandatory for BNGO to sell more units of Saphyr thanks for confirming that!

    I believe in BNGO and the future of Genomics!!

    Keep an eye on Carbon Cure, Boston Metal, ESS and Pivot Bio. All gonna be really big companies. That is all.
  • F
    Flowjob
    $BNGO conversation
    May have uncovered some plans for Bionano Genomics ( BNGO ) they want to open their own CLIA Certified Lab in San Diego, CA so they can accept human tissues for testing. So basically they are sticking their toe into a $16.77 billion market cap that Quest Diagnostics ( DGX ) specializes in.
    one big project I see them utilizing this new lab is tackling their adoption of the nanonozzle patent they received this summer.. this nanonozzle with our current Saphyr will effectively transform our unit into a optical mapping +genome sequencing (think of
    $ILMN + $PACB
    except it’s a packaged deal with optical mapping) there’s many other products they’ll be able to dedicate too with the 350 Million that they have raised
    Big things are on the horizon here 30-50 before the year ends. DYOR
    https://www.reddit.com/r/BNGO/comments/l3kkr6/may_have_uncovered_something_big_bionano_genomics/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf
  • A
    Always Right
    $BNGO conversation
    Great overview on sequencing versus mapping from here:
    https://www.reddit.com/r/BNGO/comments/l49l79/found_this_guy_on_twitter_he_explains_bngo_so/

    "
    First, the Saphyr mapper is not a sequencer, it is, as its name say, a mapper. The difference of a genome sequence and a genome map is that the map aids to decipher the sequence more accurately (for sequence I refer to billions of ATCGATCG…).

    A genome map is created before the sequencing begins and provides confidence in the sequence obtained. Therefore, the Saphyr mapper, does not compete or substitute any sequencing technology (either from $PACB, $ILMN, $TMO, etc.), but rather it is —COMPLEMENTARY— to it.

    For an analogy, think of an any given address. Imagine I live at 14th Main street, Springfield, Massachusetts, USA. And someone asks me where I live, and I simply answer “Springfield”. If the person is local of Massachusetts, will probably assume that I live in Springfield MA.

    However, if I’m asked in a state other than MA, and the person is from a state other than MA, will probably ask “which Springfield”, as there are many cities with this name in all USA; I would have to specify “Springfield, MA.”

    If you are familiar with the locality, you will probably assume its broader location. I use this analogy because almost every city in USA has a “Main” street; a lot of states have a “Springfield” city; but also, Main street in Springfield do exists in countries other than USA.

    Following this analogy, if we asked, “what is your address?” the most common different sequencing technologies will give, with great precision, the following answers: $ILMN — 14th Main. $TMO — 14th Main. $QGEN — 14th Main. $PACB — 14th Main, Springfield.

    None of the above will mention “MA, USA”. Is it possible to locate the accurate address with the first three? NO. Is it possible to locate it with PACB? NOT ENTIRELY.

    In the same analogy, if you asked the Saphyr mapper “what is your address?” the answer will be:

    $BNGO — Near Main, Springfield, MA, USA.

    Would you be able to know the precise address? NO. Therefore, there is no technology that could give a complete and accurate answer, yet.

    10) Then why is Bionano’s such a big deal? Because currently, the most common tools for mapping at hospitals and clinics around the world are FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization), DNA microarrays (commonly known as CMA), chromosome banding (CB), and Karyotypes;

    11) these techniques have existed for at least 20 years and have been the state of the art, so far. What they all have in common is that they are laborious, time consuming and will answer the following to the question “what is your address?”:

    12)

    Karyotype — USA

    Microarays — Springfield

    FISH — MA

    Cromosome banding — Springfield or MA.

    Why is it that people compare Saphyr to PACB? As you can see, the state of the art for the highest precision was held by PACB, but still it won’t give a fully accurate address.

    13) So, if hospitals and clinics around the world needed to figure out what is wrong with your genes at a large scale with the most accurate map/sequence, the only option was PACB.

    14) The biggest disadvantage, however, is that, from all technologies mentioned, PACB is the most expensive and time consuming, and it needs a special expertise that is difficult to find in sequence analysis, hence not many clinics or hospitals even offer this service.

    15) Why is Bionano’s tech the such a big deal? Because it is only as expensive as any of the other mapping tools, it is high throughput, it covers the entire genome(s) at once, it is automated, and it is way more precise than FISH, CMA, CB, and Karyotypes ALL TOGETHER.

    16) Finally, the Saphyr mapper will inexorably find chromosomal re-arrengements missed by PACB—as we all have seen it in their webinars and scientific papers— because they resemble that Springfield was erroneously located in MA, USA—but is rather located in Chelmford, UK.

    17) Why is such a game changer then? Because, if combined, a Saphyr mapper and a sequencing technology (see above) will never miss a mutation or chromosome rearrangement — for large or small this is.

    18) My forecast for the upcoming years is that there will be a massive adoption of mapping tech at hospitals and clinics around the world in the next 5-10 years, which will substitute entirely FISH, CMA, CB, and Karyotypes.

    19) Maybe, if Bionano’s tech is the only one offering optical imaging, it will dominate the entire industry for years.

    As for $BNGO stock price, I have no idea; I am only a scientist that happens to trade.The stock market behaves in ways unpredictable to me.

    20) The only thing I'm certain is that Bionano’s tech is highly disruptive in its niche. And, if there is one thing I've learned from the Market, is that one thing is the company, another thing is its product/service, and a way different beast is its stock price.

    "
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    $ILMN trading at $470 PPS and $BNGO, with a superior product is trading at a paltry $7.50 PPS? Not to mention the massive short position in BNGO....It doesn't take genius to figure out which is the better investment.......
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    Sure, why buy $BNGO with a new disrupting and highly effective technology and product for $6.70 a share when you could buy $ILMN for $400 a share? That makes sense...
  • T
    Twitter hanli1105
    ARK had sold all its 800K $ILMN shares by Jan 2021, due to no exponential growth, no genomic revolution, and especially on slowing cost reductions without the next generation of sequencing technology.
  • J
    Joe
    This appears to be from the BNGO Corp Twitter account. Hopefully this tweet helps educate that BNGO does NOT compete with PACB. 

     So to summarize all of this: it’s not $BNGO vs $PACB or $ILMN. They can do much that we can’t do and vice versa. It’s $BNGO vs many decades-old technologies used in thousands of clinics all around the world that sequencing has failed to replace, and #Saphyr can.

    It seems BNGO actually benefits from and works well with those that use PACB with BNGO not instead of. IMHO
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    $ILMN now $450 PPS, $BNGO now sub $8. ILMN execs now moving to BNGO, the writing is on the wall here. There is major upside for BNGO coming.....
  • b
    bear hunter
    $PACB conversation
    Monster moves from the $ILMN acquisition news, but keep in mind that $PACB shareholders have the final say. What's everyone's thoughts? https://medium.com/@stockmarketdiva/3-healthcare-stocks-hitting-fresh-highs-4bae339d5f95
    The healthcare sector is often regarded as a hedge from regular market forces. Recent volatility has brought this particular topic to…
    The healthcare sector is often regarded as a hedge from regular market forces. Recent volatility has brought this particular topic to…
    medium.com
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    $ILMN at $410, $BNGO at $9.64. If revenue is strong with BNGO's upoming ER, PPS will fly. There is no doubt the Saphyr System will take a big bite of the competition's revenue stream.
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    Very low volume today. No one is selling. Take a look at $ILMN today, PPS running on higher revenue. That demand and utility extends to $BNGO, without doubt. The hedgies are not selling today, They're buying.
  • R
    Rodrigo
    Twitter: People often ask why structural variants (SV) are so important and why $BNGO is laser focused on revolutionizing the way they are detected in the clinic. Doesn’t the success of $PACB and $ILMN show that sequencing and the small variants it detects are what matters?
  • T
    Trader Nick 44
    $BNGO conversation
    If you want to be in the genomics space and feel $BNGO is too pricey here, you can always buy a couple of shares of $ILMN. at $415 PPS.